Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)


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Yes; if he were to be judged by the element of ferocity in this solitude of his. As he had not voted for the death of the king, he had not been included in the decrees of exile, and had been able to remain in France. He dwelt at a distance of three-quarters of an hour from the city, far from any hamlet, far from any road, in some hidden turn of a very wild valley, no one knew exactly where. He had there, it was said, a sort of field, a hole, a lair. There were no neighbors, not even passers-by.

Since he had dwelt in that valley, the path which led thither had disappeared under a growth of grass. The locality was spoken of as though it had been the dwelling of a hangman.

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For, at bottom, he shared the general impression, and the old member of the Convention inspired him, without his being clearly conscious of the fact himself, with that sentiment which borders on hate, and which is so well expressed by the word estrangement. Finally, the rumor one day spread through the town that a sort of young shepherd, who served the member of the Convention in his hovel, had come in quest of a doctor; that the old wretch was dying, that paralysis was gaining on him, and that he would not live over night.

The Bishop took his staff, put on his cloak, on account of his too threadbare cassock, as we have mentioned, and because of the evening breeze which was sure to rise soon, and set out. The sun was setting, and had almost touched the horizon when the Bishop arrived at the excommunicated spot. With a certain beating of the heart, he recognized the fact that he was near the lair.

Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette

He strode over a ditch, leaped a hedge, made his way through a fence of dead boughs, entered a neglected paddock, took a few steps with a good deal of boldness, and suddenly, at the extremity of the waste land, and behind lofty brambles, he caught sight of the cavern. Near the door, in an old wheel-chair, the armchair of the peasants, there was a white-haired man, smiling at the sun.

Near the seated man stood a young boy, the shepherd lad. He was offering the old man a jar of milk. The Bishop stepped forward. At the sound which he made in walking, the old man turned his head, and his face expressed the sum total of the surprise which a man can still feel after a long life. Who are you, sir? I have heard that name. Are you the man whom the people call Monseigneur Welcome? The member of the Convention extended his hand to the Bishop, but the Bishop did not take it.

The Bishop confined himself to the remark:—. You certainly do not seem to me to be ill. Yesterday, only my feet were cold; to-day, the chill has ascended to my knees; now I feel it mounting to my waist; when it reaches the heart, I shall stop. The sun is beautiful, is it not?

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I had myself wheeled out here to take a last look at things. You can talk to me; it does not fatigue me. You have done well to come and look at a man who is on the point of death. It is well that there should be witnesses at that moment. It will be night then. What does it matter, after all?

Dying is a simple affair. One has no need of the light for that. So be it. I shall die by starlight. The Bishop was not touched as it seems that he should have been. This man, after all, this member of the Convention, this representative of the people, had been one of the powerful ones of the earth; for the first time in his life, probably, the Bishop felt in a mood to be severe. Meanwhile, the member of the Convention had been surveying him with a modest cordiality, in which one could have distinguished, possibly, that humility which is so fitting when one is on the verge of returning to dust.

The Bishop, on his side, although he generally restrained his curiosity, which, in his opinion, bordered on a fault, could not refrain from examining the member of the Convention with an attention which, as it did not have its course in sympathy, would have served his conscience as a matter of reproach, in connection with any other man. A member of the Convention produced on him somewhat the effect of being outside the pale of the law, even of the law of charity. G——, calm, his body almost upright, his voice vibrating, was one of those octogenarians who form the subject of astonishment to the physiologist.

The Revolution had many of these men, proportioned to the epoch. In this old man one was conscious of a man put to the proof. Though so near to his end, he preserved all the gestures of health. In his clear glance, in his firm tone, in the robust movement of his shoulders, there was something calculated to disconcert death.

Azrael, the Mohammedan angel of the sepulchre, would have turned back, and thought that he had mistaken the door. G—— seemed to be dying because he willed it so. There was freedom in his agony. His legs alone were motionless. It was there that the shadows held him fast. His feet were cold and dead, but his head survived with all the power of life, and seemed full of light. G——, at this solemn moment, resembled the king in that tale of the Orient who was flesh above and marble below.

The smile had quite disappeared from his face. I voted for the death of that tyrant. That tyrant engendered royalty, which is authority falsely understood, while science is authority rightly understood. Man should be governed only by science. Conscience is the quantity of innate science which we have within us. Monseigneur Bienvenu listened in some astonishment to this language, which was very new to him. I voted the end of the tyrant, that is to say, the end of prostitution for woman, the end of slavery for man, the end of night for the child. In voting for the Republic, I voted for that.

I voted for fraternity, concord, the dawn. I have aided in the overthrow of prejudices and errors. The crumbling away of prejudices and errors causes light.

LES MISÉRABLES

We have caused the fall of the old world, and the old world, that vase of miseries, has become, through its upsetting upon the human race, an urn of joy. The work was incomplete, I admit: we demolished the ancient regime in deeds; we were not able to suppress it entirely in ideas. To destroy abuses is not sufficient; customs must be modified. The mill is there no longer; the wind is still there.

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It may be of use to demolish, but I distrust a demolition complicated with wrath. In any case, and in spite of whatever may be said, the French Revolution is the most important step of the human race since the advent of Christ. Incomplete, it may be, but sublime. It set free all the unknown social quantities; it softened spirits, it calmed, appeased, enlightened; it caused the waves of civilization to flow over the earth.

It was a good thing. The French Revolution is the consecration of humanity. The member of the Convention straightened himself up in his chair with an almost lugubrious solemnity, and exclaimed, so far as a dying man is capable of exclamation:—. I was expecting that word. A cloud had been forming for the space of fifteen hundred years; at the end of fifteen hundred years it burst. You are putting the thunderbolt on its trial. The Bishop felt, without, perhaps, confessing it, that something within him had suffered extinction. Nevertheless, he put a good face on the matter. He replied:—. A thunderbolt should commit no error.

For whom do you mourn? Is it for the royal child? I demand time for reflection.

A momentary silence ensued. The Bishop almost regretted having come, and yet he felt vaguely and strangely shaken. Christ loved them. He seized a rod and cleared out the Temple.

Les Misérables - tome 2 by Victor HUGO read by Various Part 1/2 - Full Audio Book

His scourge, full of lightnings, was a harsh speaker of truths. It would not have embarrassed him to bring together the Dauphin of Barabbas and the Dauphin of Herod.

Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition) Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)
Les Misérables tome 2 : Cosette (LFF A2) (French Edition)

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