Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2


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This passage should be practiced similarly to the other double stop passage. It ends with an arpeggio and two harmonics. The player should use a fast bow for these harmonics.


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It uses double stops that go between first, second, and third positions. Some will use portamento. This is possibly the hardest to tune section of the work. As the player shifts, consideration for finger spacing should be made. Proper placement of half steps will ensure correct notes and tuning. The minor theme at m. The most difficult left hand pizzicato section in the piece is at m. This section can be performed without the left hand pizzicato if necessary, however, with some work, it should be able to be performed.

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The bow hand should practice the some what syncopated rhythm without the left hand. The tempo should slow in this section, also. The dynamic contrast in this section may also pose a problem during practice. Another spot for double stop portamento occurs in m. This measure should be examined carefully to make sure the player is using the proper spacing between the fingers across the strings on each double stop.

The thirds in m. The finger spacing on these must also be calculated. Polish Dance by Edmund Severn is an excellent show piece for an experienced player who has some experience with chords and double stops. The student needs to have a firm basis in shifting and intonation before playing a piece of this level.

Introducing rhythmic/bowing excercises earlier on in Simandl

In the introduction, the student should spend time learning how to properly break the chord across the string. On a down bow, you should break the chords before the balance point. On up bows, you should break them after you get a firm start on the lower two strings. The bow can be practiced separately to make sure there is a proper lift to allow the pizzicato note to speak. Finally, it can be put together and timed very precisely. This section can be practiced without the left hand to ensure bow accuracy in string crossing. The player can think of keeping the bow parallel to the floor with a deep tip to get a rich sound in this passage.


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  4. It uses the new finger to shift up. The player does not need to hide this shift as the passage is already espressivo. Another spot that may require some attention is m. This passage contains harmonics and trills. Timing on this seems to be difficult. Getting harmonics to speak may prove to be difficult as well as timing the trills. At the end of this passage, you will go back to the original theme. The passage is low on the G string and does shift to third position on this string. The marking "doloroso" evokes a painful or mournful feeling for this section. This allows the player to use portamento to move from one chord to the next.

    The finger spacing will change from a whole step in third position to a half step in first position. This must be practiced for intonation. A difficult left hand pizzicato section occurs in m. The player must move back and forth between two seemingly simple chords that will be plucked by the left hand. The pizzicato and chord changes should be played without the bow getting involved until that can be mastered.

    At that point, the player can add properly timed down bow double stops into the equation. Although this passage seems simple to the eye, it will take quite a bit of time to coordinate. The final section of the piece includes a few new challenges with a fast arpeggio followed by moving triplets that moves through a chord progression in m. Intonation may be a challenge on this sequence.

    The frame of the pitches should be practiced without the repeat triplets for tuning. Once the tuning through the chords and shifting is in place, the player should add the repeated notes. At the end, you find a fingered harmonic that can be tricky to find and lace the its preceding grace notes. Movement from the previous chord in third position to the fingered harmonic should be practiced to assist with this move.

    The Boy Paganini by Edward Mollenhauer is a great piece for a young violinist who has learned some shifting. Techniques necessary for the piece include:. In the opening of the tune, various bow distributions will enable the student to express the phrasing more eloquently. Accidentals in the opening will pose a challenge for tuning.

    Partitions intro

    Students should know the finger patterns for each part if tuning is a problem. Various approaches are seen to harmonics throughout the pieces. Good bow speed and use is required for any harmonic. The student will need to work on making each of these harmonics speak clearly.

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    Although they are marked at the point of certain notes, they may be slightly below or above where they marked. This would be an excellent opportunity to talk about the divisions of the strings that make harmonics. In the second movement's theme, the colle stroke make be used on the repeated up bow strokes. Another opportunity to use the colle stroke is in m. The variation in the second movement will require practice because its use of bowed notes and left hand pizzicato. Some exercises may be done to prepare for this.


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    6. If the student has played The Puppet Show by Josephine Trott, they should have a firm grasp on left hand pizzicato. Rhythmically, I found the entrance in the variation to be a challenge. The variation also has some chords that are slurred as arpeggios. The student will need to be able to place fingers correctly in tune without the bow. If a passage of this type is new, you may also preview rolling the bow across the strings for the arpeggio.

      I found using the wrist motion made this work more smoothly for this passage. I do not think that this is the bowing used in the Mendelssohn Concerto. I found spiccato section marked in m. A challenge through this section would be to have the student put the stroke back on the string through the crescendo and then move it off again through the decrescendo.

      The first movement of the Charles de Beriot's Concerto No. The work moves up to 8th position on the fingerboard and uses extensive passage of double stops on multiple strings including thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths and octaves. Students will read passages an octave above. Those passages can be practiced lower on the fingerboard before taking into higher positions. Students should be very comfortable with shifting to all positions while keeping the left hand shape intact. The bow should be able to work efficiently in string crossings, slurred runs, long strokes, and double stops with string crossings.

      It also comes independently as a concerto with all movements in an edition by Schirmer, edited by Henry Schradieck. In the Schirmer edition, there is a note error in m. The F should be F double sharp. To prepare for this piece, I would recommend students play a three octave a minor scale in all forms natural, harmonic, and melodic , and the Flesch arpeggios, with appropriate accelerations.

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      Students should also play an a minor scale in octaves, making sure that the second and third finger of the left hand float along on top of the string without tension. Teachers may also want to prepare students with an etude that uses sixths, fourths, fifths thirds, and octaves in this key signature. I would recommend Etudes No.

      Or even No. Ornamentation used in the pieces includes trills, grace notes, and ornamental runs. All runs will need to be timed appropriately. Grace should also be practiced at slow tempi for precision. Trills should be removed to help with rhythm and added as soon as notes and rhythms are clear.

      Chromatic passages should be worked to make sure half steps and whole steps are accurately paces. Examples include m. There is an interesting trick in m. It is introduced in 1st position and can be practiced several times there without shifting. As the piece continues in m. The teacher can help student master this and move it up and down the fingerboard as a preparation to playing the passage as written.

      Extensive octave work is used in m.

      Scales and other melodies in octaves would be helpful for this section.

      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2
      Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2 Introducing the Positions for Cello: Volume 2 - Second, 2-1/2, Third, 3-1/2

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